The Trust

The Crown acknowledged that Te Uri o Hau has suffered injustices which impaired Te Uri o Hau economic, social and cultural development. On 17 October 2002 the Historical Claims of Te Uri o Hau were settled by way of the Te Uri o Hau Claims Settlement Act 2002.

The mandated negotiators envisaged that the settlement would enable Te Uri o Hau to begin a 25 year development plan to enable Te Uri o Hau people to move away from historical grievances and towards obtaining socio-economic parity with the general population.

 

Having received the cultural and commercial redress properties Te Uri o Hau Settlement Trust set up a unique structure to achieve its objective in ‘having self reliance within it’s rohe and achieving parity with the rest of New Zealand for the next generations’.

Commercial Entity
Charitable Services
Social Wellbeing
Environmental Guidianship
Te Uri o Hau Settlement Trust

The elected board of 8 trustees charged with the responsibility to govern over
the tribal assets, provide opportunities to enhance the wellbeing of its members
and protect all interests of the hapu.

(Elder Tribal Council)

 

spiritual,
cultural,
guidance to
all levels
throughout
the Trust

PROJECTS
 
 
Georgina Connelly - Chair
Georgina Connelly (Chair)
Georgina Connelly - Chair
Antony Thompson
Georgina Connelly - Chair
George (Hori) Ashby
Georgina Connelly - Chair
Henry Holyoake
Georgina Connelly - Chair
Malcolm Welsh
Georgina Connelly - Chair
Matiu Wati
Georgina Connelly - Chair
Reno Skipper

Te Uri o Hau Settlement Trust 

On behalf of the beneficiaries to own, protect and nurture the assets, and through subsidiary companies to govern and manage the activities, so that the Te Uri o Hau people are enabled to obtain socio-economic parity with the general population within one generation.
 

The activities of the Settlement are to promote environmental and cultural awareness in its operations that meet the needs of the Te Uri o Hau members.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
Vision
  • Strong identity

  • Unity as Hapu

  • Self-determination

  • Self-sustaining

  • Cultural recognition

  • Recognition by public authorities as a provider

  • Commercially viable base

  • Integrated into other providers

  • Strong environmental influence on the Kaipara and
    Mangawhai Harbours

Te Uri o Hau Area of Interest
 

Te Tai Tokerau Maori Trust Building, 3rd Floor, 5 Hunt Street, Whangarei.